Mycorrhizal Fungi Helps Protect Plants Against Root-knot Nematodes Infection

AMF
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect both penetration and further life stage development of root-knot nematodes in tomato

The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita poses a worldwide threat to agriculture, with an increasing demand for alternative control options since most common nematicides are being withdrawn due to environmental concerns. The biocontrol potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) against plant-parasitic nematodes has been demonstrated, but the modes of action remain to be unraveled. In this study, M. incognita penetration of second-stage juveniles at 4, 8 and 12 days after inoculation was compared in tomato roots (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Marmande) pre-colonized or not by the AMF Glomus mosseae. Further life stage development of the juveniles was also observed in both control and mycorrhizal roots at 12 days, 3 weeks and 4 weeks after inoculation by means of acid fuchsin staining. Penetration was significantly lower in mycorrhizal roots, with a reduction up to 32%. Significantly lower numbers of third- and fourth-stage juveniles and females accumulated in mycorrhizal roots, at a slower rate than in control roots. The results show for the first time that G. mosseae continuously suppresses root-knot nematodes throughout their entire early infection phase of root penetration and subsequent life stage development.

STUDY LINK: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22147206
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Tomatoes Seed Sales Rocket 40% With Heritage/Heirloom Tomatoes The Most Wanted

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Tomato seed sales rocket 40% with First World War varieties the flavour of the month – but gardeners fear EU clampdown

  •     Foodies and tomato lovers tiring of buying mass-produced supermarket varieties
  •     Most popular tomato seeds include varieties introduced before WWI, like ‘Harbinger’

Sales of ‘heirloom’ British tomato seeds are soaring as foodies and tomato lovers tire of buying mass-produced supermarket varieties and turn to home-growing.

Tomato seed sales were up 40 per cent in the 2013 season according to figures from The Organic Gardening Catalogue, which has specialised in supplying seeds – some originating from before World War One – to organic gardeners for 50 years.

Some of the most popular tomato varieties driving the demand include the ‘Harbinger’ (introduced in 1910), ‘Golden Sunrise’ (1896) and ‘Ailsa Craig’ (1925) in an ever-expanding range of more than fifty colours, shapes and sizes.

The demand for more flavoursome fruit and vegetables has expanded alongside British households’ growing fussiness over their groceries and the origin of produce.

But niche tomato varieties stocked by retailers like Waitrose and M&S are often expensive and sometimes disappointing in flavour.

Michael Hedges, managing director of Surrey-based The Organic Gardening Catalogue, said: ‘Tomatoes remain the most widely-grown crop for home growers in the UK, and we’re seeing an increase in interest in the old varieties, ideally suited to home garden growing.

‘They typically have thinner skins, rich flavour and a long harvest and ripening period. It would be hard to find anything like these in the supermarket.
Continue reading “Tomatoes Seed Sales Rocket 40% With Heritage/Heirloom Tomatoes The Most Wanted”

Tomato Tip – Pinch out those Side Shoots

Tomato Tip

Essential advice for growing cordon (vine type) tomatoes, nip/pinch out those “suckers” (side shoots).
As the image says, leave the side shoots on “bush” type tomato plants!

Images scanned from both “The Practical Encyclopedia” by Sue Phillips and “The RHS Encyclopedia of Gardening” by Christopher Brickell. Edited images to change potentially misleading title.

The Heritage Seed Library (for Tomatoes)

The Heritage Seed Library (for Tomatoes)

I just wanted to to put up a link to the “charity/club” as I joined a few years ago and support what they are doing, there is an argument out there at some of the more modern tomato varieties have been breed for disease resistance and yield and in doing so have lost some of those old interesting tastes qualities of yesteryear!

The Heritage Seed Library (formally known as The Henry Doubleday Research Association) based in the UK is well known for holding a large variety of old open pollinated Heritage and Heirloom varieties of vegetables that would have otherwise have been lost or forgotten.

The basic principle is that you become a member for £20 and they send you 6-7 varieties of what ever vegetables you wish for, so if your thing is tomatoes you can get those. It’s not exactly cheap at £3 a pack but you are supporting a cause here and it’s difficult to get access to these “lines” anywhere else so you pay for what you get.

I got other veg from them but the Tomatoes I got from them in seed Enorma, Jubilee and Sugar Italian Plum. I will be updating the blog with photo’s from my greenhouse soon showing you the good and the bad.

I also got some of the Plug plants from Delfland Nurseries but I will add another post for that too.

Let me know if you have a good source for open pollinated Heritage or Heirloom seed or can suggest a good tasty tomato for me?