Small-Scale Aquaponic Food Production Book

smallscaleaquaponics

Excellent free ebook (technical paper) I found when searching around yesterday, looks like a wealth of info to tap into for those wishing to test out the benifits of Aquaponics. For those who don’t know is a symbiotic integration of two disciplines: aquaculture and hydroponics. A symbiotic relationship between plant and fish, the waste from the fish feeds the plants and the plants in turn clean the water for the fish.

The growing technique is excellent for those hoping to avoid lots of expensive chemicals, it’s also a labour-saving technique too. In times of dwindling supplies of water and arable land worldwide this production system can really help us reduce water consumption on food production and enhance our food security.

The book discusses three groups of living organisms (bacteria, plants and fish) that make up the aquaponic ecosystem. It presents management strategies and troubleshooting practices, as well as related topics, specifically highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of this method of food production. The publication discusses the main theoretical concepts of aquaponics, including the nitrogen cycle, the role of bacteria, and the concept of balancing an aquaponic unit. It considers water quality, testing and sourcing for aquaponics, as well as methods and theories of unit design, including the three main methods of aquaponic systems: media beds, nutrient film technique, and deep water culture.

LINK: http://www.fao.org/3/contents/1dea3c92-1faa-47bb-a374-0cf4d9874544/i4021e00.htm
PDF BOOK: http://www.fao.org/3/contents/362f364a-b0d1-4b3b-8aa6-a725dac6515e/i4021e.pdf
DIRECT DOWNLOAD: https://planetpermaculture.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/aquaponics_guide_pdf1.pdf

Symbiosis: Enforced Surrender?

Symbiosis Enforced Surrender

Scientists from INRA and Lorraine University in France unraveled a key mechanism in the symbiosis between fungi and trees. During this mutually beneficial interaction, the fungus takes control of its host plant by injecting a small protein that neutralizes its immune defenses thereby allowing the fungus to colonize the plant. This finding is a major advance in our understanding of the evolution and functioning of symbiotic interactions between fungi and plants – relationships that play a significant role in supporting the health and sustainability of our natural ecosystems.

In the complex world of the rhizosphere – the soil surrounding plant roots – thousands of species of bacteria and fungi compete for resources released by plants. Some fungi, such as truffles and boletus, are able to live in symbiosis with plants through their roots, by-passing their competitors to obtain sugars directly from their host.  In return, symbiotic fungi allow plant roots to absorb mineral nutrients; this improves the plant’s health, vigor and productivity. Mycorrhizal fungi are one class of symbiotic fungi that make their way to plant roots where they negotiate for housing and all-you-can-eat sugar services. But how does this negotiation play out?  Is the host plant able to distinguish between beneficial and parasitic fungi? How does the fungus avoid the plant’s immune defenses during the interaction?

Continue reading “Symbiosis: Enforced Surrender?”

Aquaponics (Barrelponics) Hints and Tips

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Aquaponics hints and tips in a Barrelponics style setup, Hints and Tips from Travis Hughey from Faith And Sustainable Technologies, interviewed by Zachary Bauer. Also some information on solar setup to take it off grid.