Setting Up Your Own Edible Rooftop Garden Book

rooftopgardenguide

“Our step-by-step guide is the ideal resource to assist you in the creation of your own rooftop garden, and to ensure its continued horticultural and social success! The guide is written for groups, individuals and establishments that would like to create an urban edible rooftop garden for educational, social, therapeutic or environmental reasons by may not have access to the necessary space to do so in soil. Our objective is to facilitate the process of creation of these edible natural urban oases so that more and more people will learn about rooftop gardening to discover its benefits.”

LINK: http://www.rooftopgardens.alternatives.ca/resources/guides
PDF BOOK: http://www.rooftopgardens.alternatives.ca/sites/rooftopgardens.alternatives.ca/files/ready_to_grow.pdf.pdf
DIRECT DOWNLOAD: https://planetpermaculture.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/ready_to_grow_rooftop_gardens_pdf.pdf

U.S. Approves First Gene-Altered Apples

GMO APPLE

The government on Friday approved the commercial planting of genetically engineered apples that are resistant to turning brown when sliced or bruised.

The developer, Okanagan Specialty Fruits, says it believes the nonbrowning feature will be popular with both consumers and food service companies because it will make sliced apples more appealing. The feature could also reduce the number of apples discarded because of bruising.

But many executives in the apple industry say they worry that the biotech apples, while safe to eat, will face opposition from some consumers, possibly tainting the wholesome image of the fruit that reputedly “keeps the doctor away.” They are also concerned that it could hurt exports of apples to countries that do not like genetically modified foods.

“In the marketplace we participate in, there doesn’t seem to be room for genetically modified apples now,” said John Rice, co-owner of Rice Fruit Company in Gardners, Pa., which bills itself as the largest apple packer in the East.

The Department of Agriculture, which approved the apples for commercial planting, said on Friday that it had considered these issues. However, it said that under the law, approval is based on whether a genetically modified crop poses a threat to other plants. The department determined that the apples posed no such risk.

The so-called Arctic apples — which will be available in the Granny Smith and Golden Delicious varieties — are genetically engineered in a way to suppress the production of an enzyme that causes browning when cells in the apple are injured, from slicing, for example.

But over time the apples will still rot and turn brown. In November, the Agriculture Department approved a genetically engineered potato developed by the J.R. Simplot Company that uses a similar technique to prevent browning.

The apple will join relatively few other examples of genetically modified fresh produce, including papaya and some sweet corn. Most of the genetically modified food Americans eat is processed, containing ingredients made from engineered corn or soybeans.

Continue reading “U.S. Approves First Gene-Altered Apples”

Soil Association In New Partnership To Certify Organic Exports To China

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Soil Association Certification and China’s organic certification body, Organic Food Development Centre (OFDC), have entered into a unique partnership that makes it cheaper and simpler for the UK’s organic businesses to export to China.

Demand for organic products in China is growing rapidly, with the market estimated to be worth USD 7.8 billion by 2015 [1], indicating that China’s consumers are increasingly looking for food and products they can trust. The partnership will allow Chinese organic consumers to access more high quality UK organic produce, as well as enabling UK Soil Association certified organic businesses, who saw strong growth of 6% in 2013 [2], to export to this major market.

Continue reading “Soil Association In New Partnership To Certify Organic Exports To China”

The Future Of Food

This BBC documentary sees George Alagiah travel the world in search of solutions to the growing global food crisis and how we’ll go about securing access to food (food security) for the rising populations. This along with coping with a ever changing climate, water shortages and the effect of our reliance/dependance on oil based fertilisers and as an energy source.

Urban Fish Farming

This is an “Urban Aquaculture” system or at least what he’s calling it, at first glace it looks like what most are now calling Aquaponics. Just found it an interesting little bit of information for those unfamiliar with the concept or processes involved. Bit of animation may help explain it a bit better to some too.

I do wish to say though that when they are using indoor lights for the plants I question if that energy could be gotten from solar panels or better yet have the plants under glass instead.

Professor Martin Schreibman says our oceans have been overfished beyond repair. If we’re going to keep eating fish and chips, tuna tartare, and all those omega-3 fatty acids, we may have to rely on aquaculture. Schreibman is working to bring those fish farms into the city.

I like the idea of fish being produced locally in our cities but this is also a system that could truly be setup in countries that are impoverished and help feed starving people around the world too.

Paul Stamets (Mushroom Man) Promoting Permaculture Ideals

Paul Stamets Talks on Living Sustainably, the Health Benefits of Eating Locally Grown Food and Health Problems Associated with Intensive Animal Farming.

It’s worth watching the full 13 minutes, they are a little fancy talking in between Paul speaking but it’s few and far between really so bare with it and enjoy.

The main thing I took from this was Paul saying how we need to preserve ancient forests as they house these beneficial fungi that could and in fact do hold the key to the “cures” of many diseases, specifically H1N1 flu pandemics.

“Interview with vegan author Paul Stamets, who is a world-renowned American mycologist and botanist specializing in fungi. He shares with us the medical applications of fungi and its roles in rehabilitating the environment. Most important, he reminds us to eat the organic vegan diet and locally as much as possible in order to preserve biodiversity in our ecosystem.”