Florida Sinkhole At Mosaic Fertilizer Site Leaks Radioactive Water

A sinkhole spanning 45 feet (13.7 meters) in diameter opened at a Mosaic Co phosphate fertilizer facility in Florida, leaking 215 million gallons of “slightly radioactive water,” a company spokesman said on Friday.
Mosaic said the monitoring system at its New Wales facility at Mulberry, Florida, showed a decline in water levels on Aug. 27 from the retention pond of a phosphogypsum stack, a hill of hazardous waste. Phosphogypsum is a radioactive byproduct resulting from the production of phosphate.
The Minnesota-based company immediately reported the incident to state and federal environmental authorities, Mosaic spokesman Ben Pratt said on Friday. But it did not otherwise report it publicly until posting information on its website on Thursday, he said.
The leaked water is enough to fill more than 300 Olympic swimming pools.
The nearly three-week gap between detecting the sinkhole and reporting it to the public is alarming, said Jacki Lopez, Florida director of the Center for Biological Diversity.

“It’s hard to trust them when they say ‘Don’t worry,’ when they’ve been keeping it secret for three weeks,” she said. 

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Preserving Peru’s Potato Heritage

Knobby, round, smooth, oblong, purple-mottled – Peru is home to thousands of potato varieties. Researchers are teaming up with local farmers to exchange know-how to protect the country’s diversity of spuds.

Project goal: preserving the diversity of potatoes and securing food supply

Implementation: The International Potato Center collects, analyzes and conserves seeds and plants of all potato varieties in the world by relying on farmers’ knowledge. The documented genetic diversity of the potato is meant to help identify robust varieties that can withstand different weather conditions

Biological diversity: Peru has more than 4,000 potato varieties. In addition, there are a further 1,000 varieties from other countries

Brownish grey, knobby and no-frills – that’s usually what potatoes are like, right? Not in Peru where the tuber comes in all colors and sizes and, at times, in curious shapes. The country is home to more than 4,000 potato varieties. Potatoes are one of the most important foods worldwide. The tuber was first imported to Europe by Europeans traveling from Peru – though only a few varieties grow here. The International Potato Center (CIP) wants to save this diversity of tubers as climate change increasingly demands more resilient varieties. The potatoes of the future are currently stored in the cool storage rooms and gene banks of the CIP while their counterparts are flourishing in the high mountains of Peru. Researchers are working closely with the local population by providing them with purified seeds for better harvests. In return, the scientists are drawing on local knowledge about potatoes and which varieties are best suited to changing soil and weather conditions.

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Organic Chicken Has 10x More Omega 3

Watch this great clip showing supermarket bought chickens being tested in a tab for fat and omega 3 contents. It basically shows that an Organic free range chickens have 10x more omega 3 and is a less fatty product than the rest.

Animals themselves can’t create their own essentially fatty acids (omega 3) they have to get that from plants/grass, along with exercise and a long (slowly grown) life. Free range is the way forward and organically fed makes a lot of sense.

Superfruit: Goji Berry

Superfood: Goji Berry

The Goji Berry, also known as Wolfberries (Lycium barbarum/chinense), the Himalayan fruit that contains all 18 amino acids (six times higher than bee pollen), 21 minerals as well as huge amounts of vitamins (A, B1, B2, B6 & E). Gram for gram they are packed with even more iron than steak and spinach and more beta carotene and vitamin C than carrots and oranges, respectively. A true Superfood if ever there was one but also the most fashionable too. The plants are very hardy and cope well with salt winds and even droughts too so are perfect for most climates and most people.

goji-berries

I’ve personally never even tried a fresh Goji Berry, only ever had them in their dried format but they were lovely, I can’t wait to plant a bush this year and eventually reap the rewards in the future. This is my little girls (coming up 2) second favorite fruit behind Blueberries, she’ll be more excited than me to try them. It’s gonna be lovely to show her them growing on the plant. She invaded the greenhouse most days eating my tomatoes from the greenhouse last year, it was so cute but I don’t think she’ll be waiting till the berries are ripe, wish the plants luck for me.