Paul Stamets Incredible Talk From The PV2 Conference

Check out this incredible talk that took place in March at the ‘Permaculture Voices 2 (PV2)’ conference. This is a free talk shared by Diego, the creator and host of the event, he shared it to promote the talks done by the other speakers.

Paul’s central premise is that habitats have immune systems, just like people, and mushroom forming fungi are the foundation of the foodwebs of land based organisms.

Our close evolutionary relationship to fungi can be the basis for novel pairings that lead to greater sustainability and immune enhancement. As w​e are now fully engaged in the 6th Major Extinction (“6 X”) on planet Earth, our biospheres are quickly changing, eroding the life support systems that have allowed humans to ascend. Unless we put into action policies and technologies that can cause a course correction in the very near future, species diversity will continue to plummet, with humans not only being the primary cause, but one of the victims.

Fungi, particularly mushrooms, offer some powerful, practical solutions, which can be put into practice now. Paul will discuss his groundbreaking research utilizing their cellular networks to create molecular bridges governing the evolution of sustainable habitats. The implications of his research are far-reaching and could spark a paradigm shift to a better future.

permacultureFarmStamets

LINK: http://www.permaculturevoices.com/audio/

Life In The Soil: A Perspective To Healthy Farming

“Bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, earthworms, and what lies between—a healthy ecosystem underfoot is key to the vigor of life above ground. A leader in soil microbiology and author of the USDA’s Soil Biology Primer, Dr. Elaine Ingham will detail the complex interactions within the soil that make clean water, clean air, and life for higher creatures possible. Learn to foster and sustain the proper balance of soil organisms, and hear how compost tea can stimulate plant productivity and stave off disease. Dr. Ingham is also the founder of Soil Foodweb, Inc. and the former chief scientist for the Rodale Institute.”

I found this to be an excellent and completely fascinating introduction to the soil food web, I’d highly recomend it. This comes in 5 parts and is around 3 hours long in total, I know I’ll be listening to this one more than once thats for sure, check it out and be prepared to learn a lot from this fasinating woman.

PART 2: https://vimeo.com/90902847
PART 3: https://vimeo.com/90908150
PART 4: https://vimeo.com/90913699
PART 5: https://vimeo.com/90913700

Soil Biology Premier Book

SoilBiologyPremier

The creatures living in the soil are critical to soil health. They affect soil structure and therefore soil erosion and water availability. They can protect crops from pests and diseases. They are central to decomposition and nutrient cycling and therefore affect plant growth and the amounts of pollutants in the environment. The soil is also home to a large proportion of the world’s genetic diversity.

The free online Soil Biology Primer version is an introduction to the living component of soil and how it contributes to agricultural productivity and air and water quality. The Primer includes chapters describing the soil food web and its relationship to soil health and chapters about soil bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, arthropods, and earthworms.

The online Primer includes all of the text of the printed original, but not all of the images of the soil organisms. The full story of the soil food web is more easily understood with the help of the illustrations in the printed (or PDF) version.

Authors:
Elaine R. Ingham
Andrew R. Moldenke, Oregon State University
Clive A. Edwards, Ohio State University

LINKS:
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/soils/health/biology/ (free online version)
http://urbanext.illinois.edu/soil/SoilBiology/soil_biology_primer.htm (also sell phyical copy $16+shipping)
http://www.nofanj.org/LiteratureRetrieve.aspx?ID=104155 (online version in PDF format)

DIRECT DOWNLOAD:
https://planetpermaculture.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/soil_biology_primer_elaine_ingham_pdf.pdf

BUY PDF BOOK:
https://sellfy.com/p/sINN/ (Digital copy $25)

Toxin Produced By Oyster Mushroom Effective Against Nematodes

Pleurotus_ostreatus_1

The toxin produced by pleurotus ostreatus reduces the head size of nematodes.

“Many detrimental nematodes exist, including parasitic plant and animal nematodes. The Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) is a famous mushroom that preys upon live nematodes. However, there have been no details reported on the mechanism of this predatory activity. Therefore, we investigated the predatory relationship between the nematode and P. ostreatus as a potential way of exterminating other various detrimental nematodes. Upon invasion by the nematode, the mushroom defends itself by causing the nematode’s head to shrink in size (anti-nematode activity). Our data suggest that this anti-nematode mechanism is associated with the peroxide of linoleic acid.”

Maybe this could be useful for things such as root-knot nematodes. Growing Oyster Mushrooms on your patch could turn out to not only tasty but also act as a natural “pesticide” as well. I’ll certainly be inoculating a few logs for the allotment this summer, maybe even some burlap sacks like Paul Statmets mentions in the last video, I believe he said the weaving is conductive to the fungi developing quickly.

SOURCE: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18379043

Paul Stamets Speaking On The “Magic” Of Mushrooms

I was again blown away hearing yet another talk from Paul, this time speaking at the Bioneers conference in 2003, in Australia. Paul starts talking at 6 minutes 30 seconds but the introduction is worth listening to though if you have the time.

Paul discusses a huge range of topics surrounding the benefits of Fungi/Mushrooms. The solutions to a huge range of problems is literally under our feet. He’s discovered many new species of fungi/mushrooms and is an advocate for saving the “old growth forest” for as he sayings “as a matter of national security”, they are still countless fungi to be discovered and we can only really dream of what benefits they could also have for humans and the biosphere as a whole. He says that we are closer to fungi than we are to plants due to things such as that fungi take in oxygen and put out carbon dioxide, same as us. He believes that fungi are intelligent and we need to team up with them to solve the problems we face using things such as bioremediation, curing diseases, natural pest control, natural hygiene and many, many more!

There’s so many things to mention but are few are:
Used to carry fire for first humans
First clinical trials with mushrooms in america
Using mushrooms as a potential cure for aids
Internets setup the same as fungi networks
Using fungi to breakdown oil spills and soil contamination
Regarding finding worlds first cure for ecoli
The advantages of burlap sacks as best to establish fungi
… and so much more!

Another talk from the same conferene by Paul, talking more in depth on some of the subjects above:

Learn more: http://www.fungi.com

Benifical Fungi Reduces Need For Plant Irrigation By 40%

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Strawberry growers could reduce irrigation inputs by up to 40 per cent while still maintaining yields, by inoculating their plants with naturally-occurring beneficial soil-dwelling fungi, researchers at Kent’s East Malling Research (EMR) have found.

Two different species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, or the two in combination, gave similar beneficial results over the control plants in trials by a team that was led by University of Kent PhD student Louisa Robinson-Boyer.

“While it has been long-known that these beneficial fungi can have positive effects on plant nutrient uptake, protect plants from infection by pathogens and buffer them against adverse environmental stresses, this work provides an opportunity to reduce irrigation by 40 per cent and still retain required growth and yield outputs,” she said.

“Working with these fascinating fungi has great potential to address some of the future food security challenges being raised by climate change. This work will greatly assist with future sustainable food production – maintaining yields while reducing inputs.”

The results are published in the Mycorrhiza journal. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi occur in most ecosystems, but their levels are much decreased across intensive agricultural systems, mainly due to soil tillage and the use of fertilisers.

Continue reading “Benifical Fungi Reduces Need For Plant Irrigation By 40%”

Paul Stamets Radio Interview On “The Power Of Fungi”

“Interview with Paul Stamets on a American Radio Radio Coast to Coast AM with host John B. Wells, I loved it and have listened several times so thought I’d share with you lot.”

John B. Wells was joined by fungi expert, Paul Stamets, who discussed how mushrooms can enhance the health of our forests, gardens and bodies. He attributed the limited knowledge about the power of mushrooms to their fleeting nature, which provides scientists little time to study them. Additionally, he mused that the varied effects of mushrooms, such as improved health, sustenance, and death, contribute to a sense of fear because “they are so poorly understood.” However, he marveled that there are over 5 million species of fungi on the planet, constituting more than half of the 10 million total species, of all organisms, on Earth.

Stamets shared numerous instances where the ability of fungi to survive and thrive in extreme environments has provided insights into potential ways that they could improve life on Earth. To that end, he revealed how, following the Chernobyl disaster, Ukranian scientists observed that mushrooms in the nearby forests were “hyperaccumulating radioactivity,” thus decontaminating large areas of land. As such, he suggested that the problems of radioactive fallout facing Japan, following the Fukushima disaster, may be alleviated via the use of mushrooms. Stamets also talked about how the unique survival abilities of various fungi forms could be used to both provide food for exploring astronauts as well as terraforming planets in the future.

Beyond the environmental benefits attributed to mushrooms, Stamets also detailed a myriad of ways that fungi have shown to be beneficial to human health. For instance, he shared the story of his mother’s battle with cancer and how, after being given six months to live in 2009, she supplemented her chemotherapy with ‘Turkey Tail’ mushrooms. Today, Stamets said, she has “no detectable tumors whatsoever” and her case has been called by cancer journals as a “best case outcome.” Furthermore, he cited studies of the ‘lion’s mane’ mushroom which was shown to reverse the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in laboratory mice. Stamets was also enthusiastic about the potential therapeutic applications for “magic” mushrooms, since research has indicated they help in treating alcoholism and post-traumatic stress disorder, calling them “medicines for the soul.”

Continue reading “Paul Stamets Radio Interview On “The Power Of Fungi””