Britain’s Oldest Tree

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‘Britain’s oldest tree’ is discovered in a Welsh churchyard and it’s more than FIVE THOUSAND years old

A tiny village is believed to be home to Britain’s oldest tree – a yew that first took took root more than 5,000 years ago.

The majestic yew that lives in in a Welsh churchyard was 3,000 years old when Jesus Christ was born, according to tree  ageing experts.

Experts have run tests on the tree in the St Cynog’s churchyard at Defynnog near Sennybridge, Powys, including DNA and ring-dating.

There are hundreds of ancient yew trees dating back at least 600 years across Britain, but the 60-foot-wide giant at St Cynog’s is believed to be the most ancient.

Tree ageing expert Janis Fry, 64, who has studied yews for more than 40 years, said: ‘I’m convinced this is the oldest tree in Europe

‘It was planted on the north side of the ancient burial mound which is now the churchyard, probably in honour of a neolithic chieftain.

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Trees in Borneo Soak Up More CO2 Than Trees in the Amazon

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MY COMMENT: How will this affect climate models?

If there was just one place in the world where it would make sense to protect trees, maintain the rainforest and damp down global warming, scientists have confirmed that it would be the island of Borneo.

A new research report published in the Journal of Ecology says that while the Amazon rainforest might be the biggest and most important area of green canopy on the planet, Borneo soaks up, tree for tree, more carbon from the atmosphere.

Lindsay Banin, an ecologist at the UK-based Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEU), and colleagues from Malaysia, Brunei, the U.S., Brazil, Taiwan, Peru and Ecuador investigated what is called above-ground wood production—the most visible, tangible indicator of carbon uptake—to see how forests in Amazonia and Indonesia measured up as consumers of atmospheric carbon.

The tropical rainforests cover only one-tenth of the planet’s land surface, but they account for about one-third of the terrestrial primary production—that is, about one-third of the conversion of sunlight into greenery happens in the tropical forests—and they soak up about half of all terrestrial carbon.

Borneo Dipterocarp

Borneo is home to the largest number of Dipterocarp species on the planet—more than 270 have been identified. They can reach up to 60 meters when fully mature. Photo courtesy of Creative Commons

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The Biggest Tree On The Planet Photographed

The Biggest Tree On The Planet

It Took 126 Photos, But Scientists Finally Fit The Biggest Tree On The Planet Into One Amazing Image.

“The President” is the name of a giant sequoia located in the Giant Forest of Sequoia National Park in the United States.

How do we know such things? We trust in Steve Sillett from Humboldt State University, who said:
“We know that there are trees that have bigger trunks, but when you add up all of the wood beside the main trunk – all of the limbs, all of the branches, all of the bio-mass above the ground – this tree is likely the biggest.”

TED Talk: “Everything You Know About Composting is Wrong”

Entertaining and interesting information on composting, it’s not quite “Everything You Know About Composting is Wrong” but he raises some good points about saving as much “leaf mold” (fallen tree leaf) to make into essentially needed rich compost and save your kitchen waste/scraps and waste paper for the Wormary (worm bin) where the worms can actually break it down into a useable form. Compost piles often struggle to break these “ingredience” down but worms enrich them into what’s known as “worm casts”, an excellent source of Nitrogen and Phosphorus as well as many other things.

Speaker: Mike McGrath @ TEDxPhoenixville
More info on speaker: http://whyy.org/cms/youbetyourgarden/

The Man Who Planted A Forest

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Thirty-four years ago when he began to plant trees, no one, including him, had the slightest idea that his effort would give birth to an entire forest.

It all began with a dream he had in 1979 to plant trees on barren land for small animals and birds to build their homes on the tree tops.

Chasing his dream, Jadav Payeng, then a young lad, belonging to the Mishing tribal community in Jorhat district, in the north eastern state of Assam, began to plant trees regularly.

Decades later, the trees have transformed into a lush forest covering 550 hectares of land, home to wild elephants, tigers, rhinos and deer.

Similarly, he is growing trees on another 150 hectares of land, which is adjacent to the first forest he helped plant.
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Lets Stop Desertification By Planting Forests

The above is a clip from “Greening the Desert” with Geoff Lawton, located in Jordan.

Documentary about turning around and regaining land lost to desertification. Geoff helps turn a baron desert into a thriving forest. He talks us through the process of transforming the desert ground via processes that included things like desalination (desalting soil), water retention via swales, heavy mulching, planting legumes and many other things and they basically end up building top soil and in turn fertility.
This is the full documentary on the subject by Geoff: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzTHjlueqFI

Also check out this Dutch Documentary “Green Gold” about a guy called John Liu who documented the Chinese rehabilitating large scale damaged eco systems (the size of the Netherlands), effectively stopping desertification:

John Liu’s full documentary that the above discusses, “Hope in a Changing Climate”:

Paul Stamets (Mushroom Man) Promoting Permaculture Ideals

Paul Stamets Talks on Living Sustainably, the Health Benefits of Eating Locally Grown Food and Health Problems Associated with Intensive Animal Farming.

It’s worth watching the full 13 minutes, they are a little fancy talking in between Paul speaking but it’s few and far between really so bare with it and enjoy.

The main thing I took from this was Paul saying how we need to preserve ancient forests as they house these beneficial fungi that could and in fact do hold the key to the “cures” of many diseases, specifically H1N1 flu pandemics.

“Interview with vegan author Paul Stamets, who is a world-renowned American mycologist and botanist specializing in fungi. He shares with us the medical applications of fungi and its roles in rehabilitating the environment. Most important, he reminds us to eat the organic vegan diet and locally as much as possible in order to preserve biodiversity in our ecosystem.”